Failing to enable dreams.

I don’t know if risk-taking is hardwired into my psyche or something that comes along with my karma.  I don’t seem to be able to repress the drive to swing off from safe-branches and see how far I can go this time. “Irrespressible Swings”, yes.

Not wanting to “be a stone and gather moss” is a social taboo so big in my society/generation that it falls in the same neighborhood with forms of “clinical dysfunction”. Hey, what can I say, the World is on my side.

didyouknow_jobs

There is a strong correlation between risk-taking and optimism and I love the idea that I’m living in interesting times. For one, technology has been creating a momentum that will eventually shift the ground of Industrial Age institutions (including learning, schooling and training) and crack them up. Do not underestimate the power of 2 years in this Technology Revolution. (I can’t believe parents are still chasing the Industrial Age dream at a time like this.).

In these times :

  • How can I not let financial ability be a barrier to learning?
  • How can I extend the learning environment beyond the classroom? (students go home and leave the whole file aside until the following week’s lesson).
  • How can I get students to interact and collaborate more? How do I make them more self-directed and more engaged in their learning?
  • How do I not let Time (schedule) and Distance (transportation) and Energy level (individual peak hours of energy) be a barrier to learning?
  • How can I duplicate the safe “make as many mistakes as you want” environment outside of our classroom?

The questions I’ve been asking started pouring into impulsive actions that has led me on my learning curve in the last few months.  Stumble, Tumble – Rock and Rollin’!

There’s another lesson I can teach in this wandering down the rabbit hole as a technopreducator (technology+entrepreneur+educator) : I’m putting myself out there as “Exhibit No.1” of how to fail until you learn how not to.

Most of my students know my background teaching for hourly wages in language centres to taking a miserable salary at a private high school. They know the car I drive, (not a Beemer) the clothes I wear,(no Gucci or labels) the slum I live in  (no millionaires here). They know the flatline graph of my Financial Intelligence. (Flat on Zero, that is). Basically, they know where I’m coming from. I’m starting at a position much worse than 99% of them – I don’t have parents funding me and as a single parent, there aren’t any backups should I fail. Which actually makes it very easy – Failure is not an option!

So here’s what I want to say :

  1. If you don’t have a dream, and you don’t ask questions of how to make things better, you’re never going to Stumble and Tumble across things (at first, they look like mistakes and coincidences but later you’re going to realize the synchronicity). And you’re never going to get Rock ‘n’ Rollin’. You need to ask questions and imagine them as if you deserve the answers to them.
  2. If you’re afraid to fail, then don’t give yourself the choice to. When you know that Failure is not an option that choice IMMEDIATELY unleashes a raw drive and enthusiam you will never have felt before. (if there’s a high that’s going to be my vice, might as well be one that makes the world a Beta place.)
  3. Worry is just another word for focussing all your attention and energy on what you DON’T WANT.
  4. Focussing on finding answers, solutions and ideas fuels your ability to magnetise them to you.
  5. You lose nothing. If you fail, “experience is what you get when you don’t get what you want”. (just watched the Last Lecture on youtube.)
  6. How many jobs are asking for “experience”? As a potential employer, I’d rather hire people who’ve made all the mistakes on their so they won’t COST ME the mistakes. In fact, I’d fire anyone who never makes mistakes, because that means they aren’t willing to go beyond their comfort zone.

What were my dreams? I wanted to enable the dreams of people. That was my dream. By enabling others, I am enabled.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Context : the thoughts behind the blog., Up the ante on teaching

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s